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Article
Using Data Expedition as a Formative Assessment Tool in Data Science Education: Reasoning, Justification, and Evaluation

Maksimenkova O. V., Neznanov A., Radchenko I.

International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning. 2019. Vol. 14. No. 11. P. 107-122.

Book chapter
Collaborative Learning in Data Science Education: A Data Expedition as a Formative Assessment Tool

Maksimenkova O. V., Neznanov A., Radchenko I.

In bk.: The Challenges of the Digital Transformation in Education. Switzerland: Springer, 2019. P. 14-25.

Working paper
Making Politics Attractive: Political Satire and Exposure to Political Information in New Media Environment in Russia

Chmel K., Savin N., Michael X. D. C.

Political Science. PS. Высшая школа экономики, 2018. No. WP BRP 63/PS/2018.

A Story Of a Russian Student in Germany: It’s So Far Away: Marya Tepliakova

Marya Tepliakova
Hometown - Krasnoyarsk, Siberia.
Home university - Higher School of Economics (Media Communications)
Guest University - Karlshochschule International University, Germany.  

 
Things which are better in Germany // which you miss the most about your homeland

- Infrastructure

- Bicycle culture

- Sweets (Milka with Oreo, Milka Triolade!)

- Recycling and eco-friendly stuff + healthy food is easier to get and it's cheaper here

- Bureaucracy (there are many documents that you must fill in in Germany, however you can understand what are they and how they benefit you)


+ Dairy products (cottage cheese, kefir, and others are tastier at home and there are many kinds of them) + 24/7 hours’ life (in Germany you can go shopping on Sunday because EVERYTHING is closed. You also can't buy a milk at 1 am or practice in the gym in the middle of the night)


How did you adapt to life outside the university? What places have you visited besides the university?

I have already been to Karlsruhe before, so at least I know where the most important places are located: the university, city center, pharmacies etc. However, I had to adjust to the way that public transport works here (and I still didn't - using the bike instead) and what the opening hours are. As I have already told you, it is very different from Moscow, where you can always find a pharmacy, a supermarket or a gym that works 24 hours a day.

Aside from going to university, I visit the local grocery daily. To tell you the truth, I am trying to get outdoors as much as I can to visit museums, shopping malls and old towns nearby. Sometimes I just want to relax at home, watching Netflix (another benefit of living in Germany, btw!)


Have you received enough support from the university?

I guess I did. The Karlshochschule International Office staff did everything they could to provide us with all sorts of information we needed for paper routine, they helped us to find the accommodation. What is more, each of us has a Karlsbuddy - a Karlshochschule student, who helps us with all sorts of stuff that can't happen. My Karlsbudddy, Lysiane, was always there for me: paper routine, registration office, during the exam on German she did her best to help me and I can be more thankful for this.


Why did you choose Germany for a semester abroad?

I started studying Germany in my 10th grade. I was eager to study in Europe, so I have decided to choose the second foreign language to learn, so I could consider going not only to American and British universities. Although my italianophilian mom wanted me to study "lingua italiana", I decided that German is going to be my second language and my biggest passion. I admire this language and its grammar, which requires a lot of concentration.

So that's why I have chosen Germany. I wanted to enhance my language skills and to find out more about the country, its culture, and cuisine.


What have you learned from the academic mobility program?

I am in the very beginning of it, but what I already know for sure that every effort I have put into coming here was not in vain. I now know that there is no better chance of meeting people all over the world than this opportunity of studying abroad. I know for sure that I am becoming a better specialist and this semester will be very helpful for my future career. What I have learned that it is alright to make mistakes, to ask questions and to differ from other people.


What courses did you attend during your semester? Which one did you like the most? (mention a professor, who influenced you the most, if you want)

I have attended the standard for International Media Management program courses plus I have chosen some specific ones: Academic Writing and, of course, German. I would really like to mention two tutors who have influenced me the most: my German teacher Nils Kohlmann and Media Creation teacher Dr. Bärbel Göbel-Stolz. Nils is very encouraging and funny: it was him who insisted that I attend higher level course than I was about to, and I am so thankful for that. I am a coward myself and I will never be brave enough to make this decision on my own.

And Barb is an amazing media professor, one of the best I have ever had! She has spent more than 5 years in the USA teaching, so she has amazing English and a great insight of what is happening in the TV industry in the USA. What is more, she is so passionate about her subject: she knows more TV series than every student in the class, and she is trying to speak with every student about his or her favorite genre. I hope that I will succeed in this class so Dr. Göbel-Stolz would be proud of me.


Was it easy for you to communicate with other students from all over the world? Have you noticed any specific features of intercultural communication?

Did you know that Germans, Koreans, Russians, and Mexicans can watch the same TV series in English and share the same sense of humor? That's what I like the most about the internationality and globalization! Everyone knows "We were on a break" phrase from "Friends".

Seriously, I have never thought that studying in Germany me, a Russian girl, could meet with a  girl from Taiwan, who is now a very good friend of mine. And there is no significant cultural shock between us! Of course, there are some little things, some traditions and customs which we were not familiar with, but they are not that important when you have found your soulmate!

However, there are some things you should know about when you are involved in intercultural communication. The rules may differ from one country to another. The Mexican girls were told not to hug and not to kiss every person that they are greeting for the first time :)


What was alike and what was different from your home university?

HSE is much bigger than Karlshochschule, you often have to "migrate" from one campus to another during the day. Karls is much more comfortable to handle, as there only 3 floors and it is very hard to get lost. I remember myself trying to find the right auditorium in the campus at Myasnitskay str., 20. That was a challenge!

And what is more, there is a great difference between the way we communicate with professors here and back at home. It was rather uncomfortable for me in the beginning, but almost every new professor asked us to address them using their name, and name only! And at HSE we tend to email more, while here we can solve all problems while just talking offline, since all professors have office hours and you can easily schedule an appointment with them.